autism, ifl vs. pfl 

"It is not more polite to avoid calling me what I actually am."

I like many things she says, but that statement really captured my attention. Exactly. It's another way to refuse to see *me* which is anything but polite.

And similarly, I'm not especially bothered by PFL in casual conversation and sometimes even use it myself. It's the specific use with an intent to somehow separate autism from the person that bothers me.

youtube.com/watch?v=Qcvge5ypbb

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autism, ifl vs. pfl 

If someone needs to continually say 'person' first to remind themselves I *am* a person, I would rather they did that than treat me as less than fully human.

My life experience, however, has taught me that those who don't see me as equally human won't start doing so simply because they change their language.

Moreover, at least when it comes to autism and autistic children especially, PFL often dehumanizes the very real person in favor of an imaginary non-autistic version.

opinion 

@tmorizot
My opinion is that one should just call me a person if they can’t call me an autistic person with the same respect and acknowledgement of my wholeness
But either way in my experience it isn’t sustainable. Autism is me, and if one isn’t acknowledging that openly, they usually aren’t respecting the ways it effects my experience and manners of functionality, either. It isn’t being acknowledged and taken seriously, so I’m not being taken seriously.

opinion 

@HellBuns Yeah, that sounds about right to me. If someone is struggling to acknowledge I'm autistic, I'm going to have a hard time even understanding the mental construct of "me" they've created and with whom they're interacting.

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